Google’s Keyword Planner is a free tool that can help you with keyword research. The tool is actually designed for the Google AdWords advertising program, and aims to help marketers select suitable keywords for ad placements. But it can also help you with search engine optimization. There are two main factors that Google considers when ranking results for a given query -- relevance and authority. The relevance of an entry is how appropriately it meets the needs of the given search query, while the authority is how trustworthy or respectable the source is. Authority is determined, in large part, by the inbound link profile of the page (and its domain) in question. To ridiculously oversimplify things, the more, higher-authority links you have pointing to you, the higher you’re going to rank. Review competitive lists and other pertinent industry sources. Since search engines focus more on the initial words of the titles, make sure you add your keywords at the start of your title tag – this will help you rank better.

Understand the increasing real-time aspect of SEO

For sites “with just a few things to mark up,” Google also offers a tool within Search Console that allows a site owner to quickly click-and-drag to apply structured data. Outliers are the actual reason why we study average and median numbers separately. Quite a few pages rank for an enormous amount of keywords, which drives the “average” numbers up. Make sure that your website is structured in a way that is friendly to search engines. If it’s tough for a search engine to crawl your site and index everything properly, you won’t get the SEO love that you deserve. Link building is hard and getting high-quality links is a time-consuming process. If you’re tempted by quick win strategies or tactics then don’t be surprised when your rankings start to dip. Creating great quality and link worthy content will help your business gain links naturally and there are also a few tactics that you can use to acquire new links.

Create related title tags and description tags

When you or your SEO Company creates links – make them hefty and serious. They should actually be almost a pain to get, whether through outreach, guest posting, or by deliberating with someone in your network to include a link back to your site. These things, when worth something for real will either take… money, time, or effort. If they don’t, they aren’t worth it. Over time, you’ll gather data that helps you determine which of your keywords are most successful, and which ones need more work -- but how do you pick the right initial set of keywords? Seeing which sites are currently ranking in the top results for a given keyword or keyword combination will help you understand and determine the online competition. And as you continually keep tabs on keyword search results, you’ll see some new sites sneak their way up. If your content is consistently very short and not original the Google algorithm is likely to consider the site low-quality.

How often the content changes

Like desktop content, mobile pages need to load fast. Slow loading pages rank lower in Google results. Google has a handy tool called PageSpeed Insights that will tell you how fast your pages are on both mobile and desktop browsers. In getting involved with SEO, you need to consider the fact that it is a full time job. It involves lots of things, in which you need to be alert for changes that may happen. While it is possible to use SEO on the same pages over and over, you’ll find that it’s a lot more effective when it’s pulling all this new content under its wings, tying it all together, and pushing it all up the search engine rankings. We asked an SEO Specialist, Gaz Hall, for his thoughts on the matter: " On a basic level, a website with good user experience has easy navigation, interesting, useful and valuable content, an aesthetically pleasing design and has quick and easy access to other pages and content on the site."

Content rated as topically relevant significantly outperforms content that doesn't cover a topic in-depth

When you’re browsing the web, the content you come across can come in a number of different flavors. Often, the nature of the content can tell you a little about the owner of the blog/website too. Either this is a website belonging to someone who is mostly interested in their visitors and who doesn’t care whether they ‘rank’ or not; or it’s content that is clearly aimed at Google, with the visitors as an afterthought. Keyword usage on a page is much more complicated these days. SEO professionals used to go as far as calculating the number of times a keyword appeared on a page to try to be in some kind of ideal percentage. That’s simply not applicable anymore and search engines are much smarter at deciphering what a page is about beyond seeing the same keyword used a bunch of times. If you have large sections of duplicate text page-to-page – that is a problem that should be targeted and removed. When selecting keywords, you should also keep the purpose of your website in mind. Opt for transactional keywords if the main intention is sales, or informational keywords if your website aims to provide readers with important information.