Not so long ago, SEO and social media marketing were different things. The idea was that SEO attracted visitors and social media marketing kept them coming back. Just like they have for on-page SEO, technical aspects of SEO have changed as search engines have become more sophisticated. You can get up to six sitelinks for your SERP listing, plus a searchbox if you can wrangle one. On desktop, this means that four or five times as much SERP space is given over to your listing, while on mobile, a sitelinked listing can take up the entire screen. How does a new website start ranking? Does it just magically appear in Google after you’ve launched it? What things do you have to do to start ranking in Google and get traffic from the search engines?

Will having a mobile-friendly website give me better rankings?

The number of external links you receive is important. Some of the top SEOs say external links are simply invaluable to your ranking power. In the earlier days of SEO, sending out press releases with keyword optimized anchor texts would get you a dozens of backlinks. In some fortunate cases, this would even make your site crawl to the top positions on SERPs. So, eventually Press releases became a tactic to build links and rank high. One of the problems international businesses continuously need to address is identifying themselves as “local” in the eyes of the search engines. Search referrals are usually divided into organic (unpaid) and PPC (paid or pay-per-click) referrals. Search referrals are easy to filter by search engine but require a little extra effort to distinguish between unpaid and paid visits. Search referral data can be misidentified and faked. Search referral data may be reported within different parameters by various analytics tools; none of the tools are necessarily wrong.

The most obvious SEO tactic

When you have submitted your website to all the major search engines, you may be thinking, what is the difference between the website that appears at the top of the page and the ones that appear 20 pages down the list? Of course, you’ll be also thinking how you can get your website towards the top end of this long list. User-generated content (UGC) sites and communities are two of my favourite places to find untapped keywords. Google wants users the most relevant results for their search. The more relevant your content is to their search, the more likely your website will be number 1 on Google. A backlink from a more important page that is high in popularity itself will count more toward a higher ranking for your website.

Understanding Your Competitive Landscape

In the vast sea of websites--from e-commerce, media and informational websites to blogs and wikis--most site owners use a basic approach to search engine optimization. They submit their site to more than 200 search engines and blast these with some domains and keywords that may be related to the site. Thin content is the idea that there’s not much actual text on an ecommerce site compared to, say, a blog or software site. Imagine dozens and dozens of thin content pages created because of random product attribute and product filter pages. Some of those pages might only list one or two products. Speaking from experience, I have often seen product manufacturers describe a product from their point of view. According to Gaz Hall, a UK SEO Consultant : "High authority links are great, but in my opinion, relevant links win the game every time."

Where are you seeing the fastest movement in the SERP’s?

A very common approach for cross linking is by doing footer/sidebar links and content deep linking. For search engines, it gets really easy to rank, when you have links to your webpage containing relevant keywords from other domain names. You might get caught up in creating different versions of content for your locale sites. But remember, creating remarkable and unique content should be your highest priority, above any other off-page seo tips. Create interesting and valuable content that other people will want to link to, no matter where they live. What Google wants to see is authoritative and relatable links talking about your site. Googlebot and other web crawlers follow the links that they find on web pages. If Googlebot finds new links on a page, they will be added to the list of pages that will be visited next. If a link does not work anymore, or if there is new content on a web page, Google will update the index.